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Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile moulting to first-winter, Essex 4th September 2010 
Note how far advanced this Yellow-legged Gull is in replacing its Scapulars this early in the season, many of the juvenile Lesser Black-backed or Herring Gulls haven't even started to replace these feathers yet.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile moulting to first-winter, Essex 4th September 2010 
Note how far advanced this bird is its moult, virtually all of the scapulars have been replaced save for a few of the lower feathers.

The scapulars are dark buffish-grey with bold dark anchor marks.

The wing coverts are dark brown centred with neat and narrow white fringed creating a rather solidly dark wing.

On the greater coverts the the dark brown becomes more extensive towards the outer feathers creating a dark 'wedge'.

The tertials are solidly dark brown with narrow white fringes that extend only about half way along the feather edges.

The upper-tail coverts can just be seen which are bright white with bold blackish bars.

Note the bill is very stout with blunt tip and prominent Gonydeal angle.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile moulting to first-winter, Essex 4th September 2010 
Compare with the bird above. This individual is cleaner white on the head and neck with isolated stand out eye thus recalling a Caspian Gull. However the head shape, chunky blunt tipped bill and large eye alone exclude this possibility.

This bird has replaced fewer scapulars.

The wing is rather uniform with only narrow fringes and again note the dark wedge on the outer greater coverts and the darker brown tertials.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex July 2011 
Note the contrasting white tail with blackish tail band with marginal blackish internal markings.

The wing coverts are edged white and give a scaled appearance. Minimal pale window on the inner primaries.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex July 2011 
Note the tertial patterning; the neat pale fringes to the coverts and scapulars give a crazy paving impression.

The head is large with large centrally placed eye with dusky markings around it. The bills hefty and blunt tipped with prominent Gonydeal expansion.

A number of inner Scapulars are newly replaced as are one or two inner median coverts.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex July 2011
Classic shape and build of a juvenile michahellis.

The large whitish head with hefty bill; the finely edged wing coverts and already replaced scapulars. The bird is rather heavy chested.

The greater coverts on this bird are particularly open with the outer feathers being darker towards the tips and gradually becoming whiter towards the inner feathers creating a darker outer wedge.

The Tertials are typically dark with fine white edges that extend about two thirds along the feather edges.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex July 2011
Another classic bird.

Again by late July some of the scapulars have already been replaced.

Note the whitish ground colour, large head, heavy blunt tipped bill, tertials and wing covert pattern and relatively elongated appearance.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, with Lesser Black-backed Gull, juvenile, Essex July 2011

The Yellow-legged Gull is the same as that pictured two images above.

Compared with the juvenile Lesser Black-backed Gull to the left the michahellis is noticeably whiter with crisper feather edges and has an over all more bulky appearance.

The Lesser Black-backed Gull is darker, more dingy with buffy-gold spangled appearance apart from the white tail.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex August 2013
I have expanded the image size for the following extremely confiding bird at the landfill to show off the plumage detail.

Note bulky but also elegant nature of the bird, long slender rear end. The base colour is whitish, relatively unmarked on the neck, with a nice diffuse mask around the eye. The lores and forehead and also whitish which is clearly seen in the head shots.

The bill is deep with pronounced Gonydeal angle and hooked tip and the eye is large and centrally placed in a large squarish head.

Already this bird is showing a few replaced scapulars, buffish with dark central anchors. The terials are dark brown with slight diffuse tips and neat edges and the undertail coverts are white with bold dark widely spaced barring.

A super looking bird and a great portrait for ID purposes.
Yellow-legged Gull - Larus michahellis
Juveniles
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex 18th August 2012
Another really big and powerful bird.

Note the darker bases to the outer greater coverts forming a dark wedge and that whilst the rest of the greater coverts are 'barred' they still appear more solid dark than on a Herring Gull of the same age; in fact the could classed as dark with pale notching.

The tertials are typically dark with neat pale edges but are not more noticeably darker than the rest of plumage. The primaries are darker brown.

The wing coverts are dark based with evenly edged fringes and more noticeable notching on the median covrts. The scapulars are already well replaced even by this early date, the buffer, sandier colour feathers with dark internal bars and anchors are now visible contrasting with the first generation juvenile feathers which are still solidly dark with neat fringes.

The body is a whitish ground colour with the belly, breast, neck and head almost unmarked with blotching limited to flanks and breast sides.

The structure of the bird helps to separate it from Caspian Gull of which some traits are similar; The hand un-marked rear belly is also a feature of Caspian Gull, as is the long pale kinked neck but here the large head with large eye centrally placed along with the large blunt tipped bill point towards a male michahellis.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex 3rd August 2013
Another typical looking individual., check the common features on this bird with those in the preceding images.
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex 3rd August 2013
Taken on the same day as the bird above this is a smaller and shorter legged individual with slighter bill so is presumably a female.

Whilst the greater coverts are more whitish on this bird, which also shows big 'teeth' marks into the inner feathers the outer feathers show the darker centres with white edges.

The overall typical plumage traits can be seen here
Yellow-legged Gull, juvenile, Essex 1st August 2009
Note the alert stance of this bird emphasis's the long legs and attenuated rear end.

Despite being the first day of August this individual has already begun to replace its scapulars with a few feathers already next generation.
Yellow-legged Gull ?, juvenile, Essex 5th August 2009
This is a slightly odd bird.

Note that for a juvenile the bill is already becoming pale and many of the median and lesser coverts show buff fringes. The replaced scapulars appear to dark centred and the tertial pattern shows more notching and the edges than would be expected.

It is likely this bird is a Lesser Black-backed Gull, or perhaps even a Herring x Lesser Black-backed Gull (or other combination) hybrid.

It does however illustrate the difficulties with any gull in any plumage, is a Yellow-legged or is it something else.....
The following are a series of Yellow-legged Gull images taken during the month of July and August which show both the typical plumages to expect at this age as well as some variations on the theme.
Yellow-legged Gull juvenile, Undisclosed location 5th September 2009
Note the greater coverts pattern, largely dark outer feathers but becoming whiter on the inners with pronounced barring. This results is a dark brown 'panel' along the wing.

The tail is distinct. Obvious broad black band with black marks on the outer feather bases and browner tips to the upper tail coverts which results in a contrasting tail pattern.
AYellow-legged Gull juvenile, Undisclosed location 1st August 2009
As with the previous bird note the greater coverts pattern, largely dark outer feathers but becoming whiter on the inners with pronounced barring. This results is a dark brown 'panel' along the wing.

The tail is distinct. Obvious broad black band with black marks on the outer feather bases and browner tips to the upper tail coverts which results in a contrasting tail pattern.
Yellow-legged Gull juvenile, Undisclosed location 1st August 2009
This open wing shot shows nicely the different upper wing feather tracts and the patterning.

The lesser upper wing coverts are dark brown fringing narrowly by white. The median coverts are dark brown with again the white fringes being obvious. The greater coverts are largely solidly dark along the wing with notching on the inner feathers only. The fringing extends only about two thirds along the outer edge.

The inner primaries show only a faint hint of a pale panel.

The tertials are dark with neat fringes with only marginal notching.
Yellow-legged Gulls juveniles
Series of in flight images now follow showing the upper and under-wings